Personal trainer in Nottingham

Personal trainers: less jargon, more action, please

Personal trainers: less jargon, more action, please

By on Dec 6, 2018 in Articles |

A lot of the PT profession spends more time trying to impress you with their knowledge, than getting you results.

I’m not anti-science, not by a LONG shot. But you have to realise that most people do not care about their valgus knees, their inactive medial glute and their kyphotic tendencies.

As a PT, yes, you kind of need to know about that kind of stuff.

But, unless your client is dead interested in it, they don’t need to know the scientific terms. They need to have explained to them, in every day terms, what the problem is, why it’s there, and how we’re going to fix it.

I don’t know how the hell my accountant comes up with my tax bill, but I know it’s probably correct, I know when it needs paying, and I know what account to pay it into. That’ll do, for me.

Most PT clients (not all, some of us love to geek out, but not all) don’t want or need to know what you know.

They’re paying you to help fix it so they don’t need to worry about it.

If your entire marketing approach is telling people, using a variety of Latin phrases, what’s wrong with them – you’re not going to have much luck. For one, people don’t speak PT language, and for two, making people feel stupid because they can’t work out what you’re on about is a really poor sales technique.

Keep the language simple, keep the problem-solving high, and most clients will love what you offer.

You don’t need to prove your skills with language, you need to prove them with results.