Personal trainer in Nottingham

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Surviving the Two-Week British Summer

Surviving the Two-Week British Summer

By on Jul 7, 2018 in Articles |

It’s finally happening! No, not the potential to win a World Cup. Something even rarer – a consistent few weeks of the kind of weather that shocks Brits to the core. We’re not set up to deal with it, so it hits us hard. Especially those of us who train and want to at least stay consistent in this weather. Our gym is essentially a big metal shed, so there’s only so much we can do to keep the building cool in this weather (we have fans and cold drinks!), but having trained in David Lloyds and Virgins over the years, even their thousands of pounds of aircon doesn’t really make a dent when we hit these temps either.   So, what to do? Here’s a quick run down of how to make it more bearable. Adjust your expectations  It’s unlikely you’re going to hit new PBs, certainly in terms of reps or volume work, in this weather. Drop your expectations and accept that doing broadly what you did last week is OK progress when Nature seems determined to kill you. This will be great news to a certain type of powerlifter who sees more than 20 reps in an entire session as cardio. 2. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate Before, during and after training! It’s perfectly possible to lose a kilo or more in under an hour even training half-assed in this weather. And not good weight either; you’re simply losing water and salts. Over a couple of days this will leave you sluggish, tired, grumpy and in worse cases, decidedly ill. Pick up some electrolyte tablets; sometimes, even just drinking more water isn’t enough as that doesn’t replace the lost salts. Hydration is probably the most undervalued factor in training at normal times, let alone now. 3. Keep cool during training.  Wicking T-shirts rather than tight fitting. Vest tops rather than T-shirts. Even a freezer ice pack that you can cool your neck and wrists down with between sets makes a huge difference. Failing that, a small towel soaked in water around your neck can bring your temperature down enough to make it more bearable. 4. Keep your calorie intake up It’s easy to drop your calories in this...

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Lifting begins at 40 (ish)

By on Jul 4, 2018 in Articles |

Luckily, I train a few folk in their 60s, who refer to “you young’uns” enough for me to believe I’m still one, at least fleetingly. Unluckily, I train around 20-somethings and have to at least try to keep up. I’ve held back from writing anything about training past your 40th until I had a couple of years of personal experience under my (thankfully not expanding) belt. As I suddenly realised I’m going to be 42 this year, I thought I’d share my nearly-two-years-worth of personal findings. Niggles don’t just go away if you ignore them anymore This has two consequences – you can go weeks or months permanently feeling injured, AND, unless you’re highly skilled yourself, you have to start spending some money on body maintenance. Those tweaks that you used to be able to run off/train through or ignore until they disappeared ? They don’t play nice any more. Instead of getting better, they get worse and spread. Tip: find someone who has experience keeping people moving, and see them as often as you can afford/schedule. Pre-emptive strikes on suspect areas – shoulders, knees, glutes – is also a winning strategy! Form is essential Come on, I’ve just explained you’re going to get more niggles than before. Did you really think that good-morning-esque squat would survive injury-free into your 40s? Smacking your bench press off your ribs? Only ever training your “front muscles” and wondering why your upper back feels like it belongs in Notre Dame? You’re going to need to lose the 20-something ego and if necessary, re-learn – if you want to keep lifting without relying on Tramadol for the rest of your life. Tip: either go back to basics and be honest with yourself form-wise, or get someone else to check things over for you. Even the best need someone to run an eye over their training once in a while. Recovery needs more than a “I’ll sleep when I’m dead” approach All the stuff you’ve read and ignored about recovery – hydration, sleep, stretching, meditation etc – suddenly is essential, not optional. I can notice a huge difference in my recovery from sessions now I get around 6.5hrs sleep a night, versus when I’d...

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Who actually has a PT?

By on Jan 29, 2018 in Articles |

As myths and misconceptions go, the idea that all personal training clients are bored housewives with nothing better to do with their time and money is up there with Bootea being good for you, and endless treadmill running being the best way to lose fat. In short, it’s (let’s go all topical) fake news.     We hear it a lot though, from friends, family and random people we meet. We even hear it from clients who DON’T fit that mold, and think that they are the exception. The truth is, our client base at RWF, in terms of the personal training AND the gym membership, is massively varied. We had no idea when I started out how varied it would be. The problem we have is that if we’ve heard this misconception being carelessly thrown around so often, how many other people hear it too? Does it put people off personal training? We have had clients from the age of 10 right up to 80. The youngest client we currently have is 13, the oldest 79, and every age in between. If we had to state a typical age range for PT, it’d be something like 30 – 45. Our client’s careers range from student, to housewife/husband, secretaries, managers, GPs, company directors, self-employed people in a whole range of industries and semi-pro sports-people, even an ex-Olympic athlete. We’ve trained new and experienced gym instructors, and MDs of multi-national companies. We’ve trained people that work part time, and people that work 70 hours a week. We train powerlifters, Olympic lifters and people that just want to be more active. So, to be honest, we don’t look for any particular ‘type’ of client. We do have a few pre-requisites though for success though. Be prepared to work hard (within YOUR capabilities) Show up with the attitude to get cracking Do at least 80% of what we tell you to do in between sessions Always be upfront and honest about your nutrition and your activity levels Don’t be put off getting a PT because you think it’s something rich people do, or something for people other than you. Personal training isn’t about status or stereotypes, it’s about making you the best version of yourself that you can be....

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Bumps and Barbells: Raising the Bar for Prenatal Fitness

Bumps and Barbells: Raising the Bar for Prenatal Fitness

By on Jul 9, 2017 in Articles |

  Contributed by Charlotte Hughes. So you’re pregnant. Not only must you now give up the prosecco, cured meats and coffee but you must also give up exercise….right? Wrong. Join me on a reminisce through my prenatal fitness journey. First Trimester I’m not going to pretend I didn’t struggle. The first trimester saw me through the majority of the summer, right when RWF moved into its new premises. No one at this time knew about my pregnancy so I had to put a brave face on the morning sickness and fatigue. It was horrendous! I helped the team set up the shiny new equipment…squat racks, hack squat, deadlift platforms, painting the walls, whilst thinking miserably to myself “I’m not going to be able to use any of this stuff for another 7 months!”. Well. I was wrong. I soon realised that pregnancy isn’t the disability some people make it out to be. Pregnancy is just a temporary condition which you can easily adapt to, given the right environment and some determination. So, amongst the heatwave we had during August and the constant feeling of being hungover, I battled through my training sessions, with only minor adaptions. I hung up my weightlifting belt and accepted that heavy deadlifting was off the plan for a few months, but I did continue squatting, flat benching, straight leg deadlifting and military pressing, with very little compromise to weight or form. Second trimester So, now the secret was out. My pregnancy was well known and my little bump was beginning to take shape. I started to feel a little more human at this stage too. No fatigue and at last, no morning sickness!   My attendance at the gym resumed, managing to train at least five times a week, each session lasting around 45 minutes. At this stage I accepted I needed to make a few sacrifices, but only to the weight I lifted and in some cases, the way I lifted it. There was to be no more flat bench pressing as this just put too much pressure across my core. Instead I moved to incline bench. I also introduced much more back work such as seated cable rows, high/low rows and single...

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A new kind of gym environment…

By on Feb 10, 2017 in Articles |

When we set up the RWF Gym six months ago, we were very conscious that we were taking a very successful personal training business into a whole new arena. I’d personally spent nearly 8 years setting up a company that encouraged all walks of life to accept that personal training, and getting stronger, was for everyone – not just those guys in stringer vests and girls who endlessly selfie their arses in the big commercial gyms. Our unique selling point was two private PT rooms, fully loaded with strength training kit suitable for all levels (I trained in my old PT studio myself and made it to National level in powerlifting) whilst not being intimidating. So, when we decided to up sticks, take the plunge and open a public-access gym, I had to think long and hard about how to do it. I wanted to take 100% of my existing clients with me. I didn’t want to lose ANYONE. We were only moving half a mile, but more important was the fact that we’d now be a GYM. Not just some rooms. So, my partners and I decided we would steal some of the gym floor to recreate two PT-only rooms. It cost more, it reduced gym floor space and goes against everything in gym design…but we did it anyway. And guess what? Every single client came with us. It meant they could still PT in private. But what else happened? Well, we wanted to make sure all of these PT clients felt so comfortable training in the main gym area that they’d join up. In the first month, 20 of them did just that, and their trust in what we wanted to create meant we had paying members from day one. Also, with very few exceptions, all of them were happy training on the gym floor. We’d made sure they felt this was THEIR gym – not a gym belonging to the usual gym crowd. We promised all our clients and founder members that we would keep a nice, respectful atmosphere. That we wouldn’t allow idiots, drug-abusers and gangs of kids join. Many of our clients initially doubted this – what new business in it’s right mind would...

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“I could join *insert other gym* for that”

“I could join *insert other gym* for that”

By on Nov 3, 2016 in Articles |

So, we’ve had the RWF Gym for nearly four months now. And we’ve learned a LOT. Most of it good, and a lot of it relating to strategic timing of coffee to keep you alert over 15hr days… Things have gone better than expected. We’ve signed up a big chunk of the members towards our first year’s goals, and the personal training side of the business has grown drastically too (an unexpected, but very pleasant, side-effect). One thing that has cropped up from “walk in” potential gym members is price, though. So, we thought we should explain exactly why we charge what we charge. We charge £50 a month for a gym membership (or £40 if you’re having any PT with us). We also offer day passes at £6 for people who can only get to us infrequently. For people who don’t know anything about RWF, and think we’re “just another gym”, the first response we often get is “that’s expensive. I could join X for the same” or “but X only charge £15 a month”. The flippant answer would be, why not go and join those places then? But, sometimes, the benefits of joining a gym like ours might not be apparent on a casual look. We don’t have queues for equipment. We have more squat racks, Olympic bars and plates per member than ANY other gym in Nottingham We don’t have broken/cheap equipment. We have members that ALL, without exception, tidy up after themselves and put weights away We offer anyone free help with their training – whether that’s form checks or even simple programming issues. Everyone. Free. We have a zero tolerance to drugs, to idiotic behaviour, to half-naked mirror selfies and to anti-social gym habits. To be perfectly honest, the last point there is where price comes in. Yes, you could join the local Big Dave’s Gym and work out with the roiders for £15 a month. If that’s your scene, go for it. It isn’t ours, never will be, and we didn’t set this place up for that. Likewise, you could join one of the plethora of Health Clubs and have a pool, sauna and Boxercise classes you’ll never use. Great – again, if...

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