Personal trainer in Nottingham

Posts by Derran

Don’t be afraid to be excellent

Don’t be afraid to be excellent

By on Dec 10, 2018 in Articles |

In a world where we’re all encouraged to be the best version of you, love ourselves, tell ourselves we can be anything we want and that we’re always good enough regardless of whether it’s true, it’s difficult to recognise the truth. Sometimes we’re not where we need or want to be. This fake-positivity has come, like a lot of things, from a good place. It’s meant to raise people up when they’re down, to make people feel good about themselves and to combat the kind of feelings that can, over time, lead to depression. The trouble is, telling everyone that effort doesn’t matter, that achievement is irrelevant, and that you can be happy just by deciding that where you are now will ‘do’, harms more people than it helps. You don’t need to be harsh on yourself. But, like being too overly-critical of yourself, being too accepting of things you want to change doesn’t help either. Giving everyone a medal for winning doesn’t make the losers feel better; it makes them feel self-conscious. It makes the actual winners wonder why they bothered. It brings everyone down to a level that no-one is happy with. Telling everyone that the athlete who worked their body to the bone to look or perform the way they do that it doesn’t matter, because the guy who came last is just as talented in his own way, helps no-one. It kills ambition, and deep down, everyone knows it’s not true anyway. It’s OK to want to excel. It’s OK to want to be better, to improve vastly from where you are. Whether you want to get stronger or lose weight, or just feel better, it’s really OK to decide that where you currently are isn’t good enough. You don’t need to “love yourself as you are” – what if you DON’T love how you currently are? Maybe being told to accept yourself as you are, when you’re clearly not happy, is the worst thing you could do? The message is clear: only accept yourself and your current condition if it matches what you ACTUALLY want, rather than what some online guru wants you to accept. Just like self-hatred is a terrible thing, so is...

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Personal trainers: less jargon, more action, please

Personal trainers: less jargon, more action, please

By on Dec 6, 2018 in Articles |

A lot of the PT profession spends more time trying to impress you with their knowledge, than getting you results. I’m not anti-science, not by a LONG shot. But you have to realise that most people do not care about their valgus knees, their inactive medial glute and their kyphotic tendencies. As a PT, yes, you kind of need to know about that kind of stuff. But, unless your client is dead interested in it, they don’t need to know the scientific terms. They need to have explained to them, in every day terms, what the problem is, why it’s there, and how we’re going to fix it. I don’t know how the hell my accountant comes up with my tax bill, but I know it’s probably correct, I know when it needs paying, and I know what account to pay it into. That’ll do, for me. Most PT clients (not all, some of us love to geek out, but not all) don’t want or need to know what you know. They’re paying you to help fix it so they don’t need to worry about it. If your entire marketing approach is telling people, using a variety of Latin phrases, what’s wrong with them – you’re not going to have much luck. For one, people don’t speak PT language, and for two, making people feel stupid because they can’t work out what you’re on about is a really poor sales technique. Keep the language simple, keep the problem-solving high, and most clients will love what you offer. You don’t need to prove your skills with language, you need to prove them with...

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MyFitnessPal and Calorie Tracking

MyFitnessPal and Calorie Tracking

By on Dec 6, 2018 in Articles |

Suggest to people that keeping an eye on their bank balance might be a good idea, and no-one bats an eyelid. You know; just make sure enough is coming in to match everything going out. Check your balance once a week or so. We all know if we don’t pay attention, we spend more than we intend. So why when it’s suggested that people monitor their food and drink intake for a few weeks, does the world turn upside down? It’s not really any different. In fact, the knowledge that tracking your intake for a few weeks can give you is almost literally invaluable. It can save you hundreds or thousands of £ over a year. It can shrink your waist and improve your health, in turn keeping you active and strong. It can help you get over that “sticking point”, free of charge, that until now you’ve been throwing supplements – and £££ – at. If I said I could save you thousands a year by going through your finances, you’d probably give it a go. Apply the same mentality to the thing you only ever get one chance at: your health and your body. Tracking is education. It teaches you what’s in the food you eat. It removes the misconceptions and (sometimes) wilful self-deceit. You know deep down that sausage roll probably isn’t 100kcals, but did you know it’s 600? Bananas are basically calorie free, right? Not 120-140 each, surely… Proper tracking, and being guided in it by folk like RWF, can actually be tremendously liberating. You suddenly have control. You have numbers and parameters to work with. And when you start seeing those numbers translating into the change you want to see in your body…then the value of investing a little time and thought becomes blindingly obvious. What IS tracking? At it’s loosest, tracking would be simply writing down what you eat each day. What, when and the amount. For some people with particularly poor or haphazard eating habits, this can be enough to kickstart a big change- “oh my god, I didn’t realise I ate so much crap all the time”. Once it’s written down, it’s hard to BS yourself. You can either accept something...

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The Fitness Industry Lies To You

The Fitness Industry Lies To You

By on Nov 22, 2018 in Articles |

It seems to be human nature to focus on the little things that make no difference, while ignoring the vast areas of life that we can make positive changes to. We stress about being too busy at work, when in reality we could just work a bit smarter or turn up half an hour earlier. We stress about not sleeping enough, but stare at a screen for hours past our bedtime. We stress about money, but spend £100 on a night out at a weekend or sign up to a shiny new phone contract we don’t really need. We stress about our relationships with family and friends, but we still don’t pick up the phone often enough and actually make contact. With health and fitness, so often we “major in the minors”. We spend hours obsessing over what protein powder is best, what set/rep scheme is best, what our perfect macro split should be, whether Exercise A is better than Exercise B. And you know what? That’s all great. If – and here’s the kicker – IF you’re already actually doing something. All too often we see people worrying about what they should or shouldn’t eat to lose weight. Whether by cutting something out, or adding something in, the weight will come off quicker. The same people, when asked, will often have no clue how much they ate yesterday, or last week, or the week before. They’re focusing on a tiny area, while entirely missing the big picture – namely, what am I *already* doing. You can’t change what you don’t measure. The fitness industry doesn’t help. And it’s not unintentional killing with kindness either. It’s malicious, it’s cynical and it’s unethical. DNA and food intolerance testing when the practitioners KNOW full well the science is not strong enough to back it up. Fitness superstars injecting more performance enhancers than Arnie then claiming it “woz all the BCAAs wot done it, honest guv”. Girls in bikinis living off Daddy’s money (or worse – there’s a large section of Instagram fitness models that travel the world off the back of selling more than just slimming teas…) telling you to love your body whatever size you are, while secretly being borderline...

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How do I get enough protein?

How do I get enough protein?

By on Oct 24, 2018 in Articles |

Ok – you’ve started a new fitness kick. It’s going great. But now your PT has told you to “up your protein intake”… The “why” isn’t what we’re going to get into here (let’s just say recovery, muscle growth/retention and feeling satisfied after a meal are the basic reasons), it’s the HOW and the WHAT. If you’re female, you’ve probably been given a daily target of anywhere between 80-120g. If you’re a guy, we could be talking anything from 140-200g (much more than that is overkill unless you’re The Rock). Don’t be daunted by the numbers. It’s perfectly do-able. But, there’s always a but, it won’t happen by accident. Getting enough protein in to support training and exercise is unlikely to happen by accident unless you’re already enough of a carnivore to give PETA nightmares. You’ll need to make sure that every main meal you consume has a protein source as the “main” part of it. You’ll also need to make sure than most of your snacks are based around protein sources, rather than carb sources. We’re thinking jerky, boiled eggs, protein bars, mini-cheeses etc, rather than Mars Bars and crisps. Vegetarians and vegans – sorry, it’s just a simple fact that you are going to REALLY plan your nutrition. Unless you plan on relying on supplements (not ideal) then you are going to struggle if you don’t plan. There are plenty of non-animal based foods that have protein, but not in anything like the quantities that meat has; even so-called high protein vegetarian/vegan protein sources require you to eat a huge quantity to simply get the protein content of one chicken breast.   To save you having to carry and pen and paper around with you all day, use an app like MyFitnessPal to track your food intake – our previous article here will help! What’s the best sources? So, let’s talk sources. Some are obvious – some not so.   Chicken and turkey are high protein (20-30%), but relatively low calorie – so an obvious top choice. Other meats all have varying quantities, but will generally be at least 15% protein. Dairy (milk, eggs, cheese) are lower down, but still have a good content – they just...

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