Personal trainer in Nottingham

Posts made in July, 2018

Surviving the Two-Week British Summer

Surviving the Two-Week British Summer

By on Jul 7, 2018 in Articles |

It’s finally happening! No, not the potential to win a World Cup. Something even rarer – a consistent few weeks of the kind of weather that shocks Brits to the core. We’re not set up to deal with it, so it hits us hard. Especially those of us who train and want to at least stay consistent in this weather. Our gym is essentially a big metal shed, so there’s only so much we can do to keep the building cool in this weather (we have fans and cold drinks!), but having trained in David Lloyds and Virgins over the years, even their thousands of pounds of aircon doesn’t really make a dent when we hit these temps either.   So, what to do? Here’s a quick run down of how to make it more bearable. Adjust your expectations  It’s unlikely you’re going to hit new PBs, certainly in terms of reps or volume work, in this weather. Drop your expectations and accept that doing broadly what you did last week is OK progress when Nature seems determined to kill you. This will be great news to a certain type of powerlifter who sees more than 20 reps in an entire session as cardio. 2. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate Before, during and after training! It’s perfectly possible to lose a kilo or more in under an hour even training half-assed in this weather. And not good weight either; you’re simply losing water and salts. Over a couple of days this will leave you sluggish, tired, grumpy and in worse cases, decidedly ill. Pick up some electrolyte tablets; sometimes, even just drinking more water isn’t enough as that doesn’t replace the lost salts. Hydration is probably the most undervalued factor in training at normal times, let alone now. 3. Keep cool during training.  Wicking T-shirts rather than tight fitting. Vest tops rather than T-shirts. Even a freezer ice pack that you can cool your neck and wrists down with between sets makes a huge difference. Failing that, a small towel soaked in water around your neck can bring your temperature down enough to make it more bearable. 4. Keep your calorie intake up It’s easy to drop your calories in this...

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Lifting begins at 40 (ish)

Lifting begins at 40 (ish)

By on Jul 4, 2018 in Articles |

The other day, my colleague Tim and I were chatting about our client lists. We realised that between us, we train 34 (yep, 34) clients that are over 40yrs old. Luckily, a few of them are folk in their 60s, who refer to “you young’uns” enough for me to believe I’m still one (at 42), at least fleetingly. Unluckily, I train around 20-somethings and have to at least try to keep up. I’ve held back from writing anything about training past your 40th until I had a couple of years of personal experience under my (thankfully not expanding) belt. As I suddenly realised I’m going to be 42 this year, I thought I’d share my nearly-two-years-worth of personal findings. Niggles don’t just go away if you ignore them anymore This has two consequences – you can go weeks or months permanently feeling injured, AND, unless you’re highly skilled yourself, you have to start spending some money on body maintenance. Those tweaks that you used to be able to run off/train through or ignore until they disappeared ? They don’t play nice any more. Instead of getting better, they get worse and spread. Tip: find someone who has experience keeping people moving, and see them as often as you can afford/schedule. Pre-emptive strikes on suspect areas – shoulders, knees, glutes – is also a winning strategy! Form is essential Come on, I’ve just explained you’re going to get more niggles than before. Did you really think that good-morning-esque squat would survive injury-free into your 40s? Smacking your bench press off your ribs? Only ever training your “front muscles” and wondering why your upper back feels like it belongs in Notre Dame? You’re going to need to lose the 20-something ego and if necessary, re-learn – if you want to keep lifting without relying on Tramadol for the rest of your life. Tip: either go back to basics and be honest with yourself form-wise, or get someone else to check things over for you. Even the best need someone to run an eye over their training once in a while. Recovery needs more than a “I’ll sleep when I’m dead” approach All the stuff you’ve read and ignored about recovery –...

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