Personal trainer in Nottingham

Posts made in June, 2011

Bodyweight Training Basics

By on Jun 29, 2011 in Articles, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Not everyone wants – or indeed needs – to get into a gym to achieve their goals. You already possess a home gym – your body. Using the most basic bits of home furniture as an aid, just look at some examples of what you can do: Lower body – squats, lunges, burpees, calf raises, tuck jumps, mountain climbers Upper body – press-ups (of which there are tens of different variations), tricep dips, bicep curls, one arm rows Core – v-sit ups, crunches, leg raises, bicycle crunches, planks…abdominal work has endless possibilities. Throw in just £50 worth of additional equipment (like a kettlebell and a chin-up bar) and you can add literally hundreds of additional exercises into your home workout repertoire. How does it all fit together? When planning your home workout, think about what you want to achieve. If you want to get ‘fitter’, then we need to do a lot of circuit style work, high reps, and keep you moving quickly between exercises. We need to get you out of breath, and keep you there. Improving ‘Fitness’ Squats x 20 reps [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/zqj1qjIA6E0[/youtube] Lunges x 10 reps on each leg [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/ewcCi9Ai0tk[/youtube] Mountain climbers x 50 reps [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/KI8u58hPam4[/youtube] Rest 60 seconds, and repeat. Try to complete 3 times. Then: Press-ups x 20 (from the knee if necessary) [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/Eh00_rniF8E[/youtube] Dips (using a chair) x 10 [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/tKjcgfu44sI[/youtube] Crunches x 20 [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/KK1eTLViYXI[/youtube] Plank position for as many seconds as possible [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/v/MHQmRINu4jU[/youtube] Rest 60 seconds, and repeat…again, 3 times. That should get you out of breath, and if you’re new to exercise, be a very challenging workout. If you find it too easy, add another 10 reps onto every flipkart apk exercises, and cut down the rest time. If it is still too easy, add more circuits. Do it 4, 5 or 6 times – the beauty of training at home is that you can keep going as long as you want. Aim to train every other day at first, and don’t be afraid of some aches – that’s the feeling of your body waking up! Keep an eye out for the next blog in this series, where we’ll take a look at how to incorporate some very cheap additional equipment into your...

Read More

RWF group exercise classes – ‘Boot Camps’

By on Jun 25, 2011 in Articles, Uncategorized | 0 comments

It was brought to my attention recently that the term “Boot Camp” has put off a few people from having a go at attending these sessions that we run. So, I thought I”d put a blog together to explain what the sessions are like, and to try and dispel a few misconceptions. First of all, let me tell what ISN”T going to happen: 1. No-one will make you feel weak, or inadequate, if you can”t do everything. Every person at these classes (the trainers included!) has been where you are now – perhaps nervous, unsure about exercise, out of shape, out of practice etc. Everyone starts somewhere. RWF have a zero tolerance policy towards any kind of belittling behaviour. The atmosphere we encourage is a supportive one (with an element of informal competition between those people that like competing) 2. No-one is going to stand and shout at you, Sergeant Major-style. Shouting at someone and pushing them simply makes people feel that they aren”t good enough, and embarrasses everyone involved. If you want/need to be shouted at, then these sessions aren”t for you. There are plenty of bootcamps run by over-zealous Army wannabees who will charge you to be shouted at for an hour. We won”t. You”ll be pushed, and encouraged, but it”s constructive – not to satisfy your trainer”s ego. 3. You won”t be made to continue if you can”t keep up. You”ll work at your pace. Sure, we”ll encourage you to keep up. We”ll let you know if we think you could do better, but we”ll never push you beyond your capabilities. Saying that, you”ll probably find you are capable of a lot more than you think you are. 4. You won”t be doing Army-style training We aren”t going to make you run for 30 minutes. We won”t make you crawl in the mud under cargo nets, or make you wear Army camouflage for an “authentic” experience. You won”t have to climb up and over 10ft high obstacles. So, what will you learn to do? You”ll get good at being able to manipulate your own bodyweight to use as a training tool. You”ll learn, and get good at, basic bodyweight moves. These are fundamental things that many...

Read More

Weight loss fundamentals…

By on Jun 22, 2011 in Articles, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Losing weight is the easiest thing in the world. There, I’ve said it. Now, before you dismiss me as someone who doesn’t have a clue about how hard it is to lose weight, hear me out… Everyone knows, deep down, what foods they should and shouldn’t be eating. Everyone knows that eating five or six portions of vegetables and fruit each day, and eating things like chicken and fish regularly, is important. But how many people actually do it? Everyone also knows, deep down, that chocolate, crisps, sugary cereals, fizzy drinks etc are bad for you…but again, how many people successfully cut them out when trying to lose weight? Even if you are one of the few people that gets the above stuff right, are you sure you aren’t sabotaging your efforts by eating things you think are good for you, but aren’t? Are you avoiding foods you really should be eating, because you are still listening to out-dated science and old wive’s tales? Chances are that if you are having ‘healthy’ cereals for breakfast, and ‘healthy’ low-fat yoghurts, and ‘healthy’ ready meals, whilst avoiding eating eggs (they’re high in fat, surely?), never cooking in olive oil and ignoring anything that looks remotely like a carb, you are doing yourself no favours. Ultimately, losing weight – and let’s be honest, it’s FAT we want to lose, not necessarily ‘weight’ – is about creating a deficit. You want to burn off more calories than you consume. If you don’t know how many calories your body needs each day, how can you know how many calories you should be eating each day? There’s your starting point. Once you know how many calories you need, you can adjust your intake to make sure you are eating about 500 calories a day under that level. There’s nothing mysterious about it – if you eat at least 3,500 calories a week less than your body needs, you WILL lose weight. Whilst it may seem a bit confusing sometimes, you need to bear in mind that the diet industry is absolutely massive. It’s said to be worth more than one billion pounds a year in the UK alone. Diet plans, slimming clubs etc, don’t really want...

Read More

Sports Performance and Injury Prevention

By on Jun 21, 2011 in Articles, Uncategorized | 0 comments

It seems obvious, but your sporting performance is linked directly to your general conditioning, your diet and your ability to perform functions that are key to your sport.So why do so many amateur AND professional sports people fail to address any or all of these in their training? A lot of team sports – football and rugby in particular – are very high risk in terms of causing injuries. Now, if you can do something to minimise that risk and extend your playing career, or remove niggles that prevent you performing at your best, that’s going to make you enjoy your sport that much more. I’ve trained a lot of rugby and football players who felt they needed to improve their conditioning and strength to ensure they could last a match, or to push through into a first team. Kettlebell work in particular translates well into rugby – there’s a lot of single arm and single leg work, which matches up well with a lot of the in-game movements your body will make. I’ve trained cricketers who need to improve their bowling speed, and their batting average. Most people don’t realise how much the back and core is involved in sport, and once this strength and flexibility is improved, it’s no surprise that the performance at the sport also improves. Whatever your sport, supplementary training is essential to get the most out of it. Even if your sport if just a hobby, additional training will help you get more out it – after all, professional sportspeople don’t simply practice their sport, they also train around it to improve. Injury Prevention and Rehab Most sporting injuries are simply accidents – things that can’t be avoided. However, it IS possible to insure yourself against minor, and sometimes major, injuries by strengthening areas that are more likely to be damaged. For example, strengthening hamstrings and calf muscles helps to stabilise the knee joint, and means the knee is less likely to suffer ACL strains, or even tears. Even if you do injure the knee, having strong supporting musculature means the rehab and recovery period will be very much shorter. The vast majority of injuries in team ball sports, are to the knees...

Read More

The typical personal training client…

By on Jun 21, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

…doesn’t exist 🙂 As myths and misconceptions go, the idea that all personal training clients are bored housewives with nothing better to do with their time and money is up there with Special K being good for you, and endless treadmill running being the best way to lose fat. In short, it’s a load of rubbish. We hear it a lot though, from friends, family and random people we meet. We even hear it from clients who DON’T fit that mold, and think that they are the exception. The truth is, our client base at RWF is massively varied. I had no idea when I started out how varied it would be. The problem we have is that if we’ve heard this misconception being carelessly thrown around so often, how many other people hear it too? Does it put people off personal training? We have had clients from the age of 17 right up to 72. The youngest client we currently have is 16, the oldest 70, and every age in between. If we had to state a typical age range, it’d be something like 30 – 45. Our client’s careers range from student, to housewife/husband, secretaries, managers, GPs, company directors, self-employed people in a whole range of industries and semi-pro sports-people, even an ex-Olympic athlete. We’ve trained new and experienced gym instructors, and MDs of multi-national companies. We’ve trained people that work part time, and people that work 70 hours a week. So, to be honest, we don’t look for any particular ‘type’ of client. We do have a few pre-requisites though: Be prepared to work hard (within YOUR capabilities) Show up with the attitude to get cracking Do at least 80% of what we tell you to do in between sessions Always be upfront and honest about your nutrition and your activity levels Don’t be put off getting a PT because you think it’s something rich people do, or something for people other than you. Personal training isn’t about status or stereotypes, it’s about making you the best version of yourself that you can be. It’s about getting you results quicker than you trying to figure it all out on your own. We have several clients here that have achieved strength levels that...

Read More